The case for term limits

Term Limits

The idea of term limits for Congress is not a new or novel idea. When Congress was originally established, the Constitution established no such limits on how long a particular member could serve, but at that time, there was really no need. Our leaders were not so much politician as they were regular men who wanted to serve their country, but were ready and willing to go back to their homes and pick up their lives where they left off. In other words, they were the first and truest examples of a citizen government. What we have today is a completely different sort of individual, the modern politician. Once they arrive in Washington, they seem to find it very hard to leave.

Here is → Read More

The Supreme Court: Term Limits and Judicial Review

What is the role of the Supreme Court? Here’s what Article III Section 2 of the Constitution says: “In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, and those in which a state shall be party, the Supreme Court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before mentioned, the Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such exceptions, and under such regulations as the Congress shall make.” A little confusing but what’s important is what is not there — nowhere does it say anything about the Supreme Court being the sole interpreter of “law” nor does it give the Court veto power over laws passed by Congress. The Founders specifically did not give the unelected → Read More