In Which Political Kettle of Fish Would You Rather Be Boiled?

Thoughts on Politics, Super Tuesday Edition

My father and I watched the newly released documentary Fixing America last night, in which we both appear. Dad did a particularly nice job, and his discussion on energy (as a retired Chemical Engineering professor) was sufficiently lengthy and involved to merit accompanying animation for his commentary on solar energy’s future.

That said, the great strength of Fixing America is the great strength of America itself—the ordinary folks. As the late William F. Buckley said (and I hope I have this correct—it proved confoundingly difficult to corroborate) “the average American has always been a little bit above average.” The documentary shows a struggling country that does not see the problem as being Democrat. Nor does it see the problem as being Republican. Main Street knows the problem is Republicans and Democrats. And the folks on the street are smarter than the folks in the Ruling Class; they know what the heck’s going on since they’re living in the wreckage.

(For full disclosure I am working on Gary Johnson’s campaign, but my father hasn’t really given him serious consideration yet. Have no fear, I am confident he will not vote for a D or an R this year—he’s too awake for that.)

After the movie was over, we chatted about politics. We talked about bag-of-gas Obama, Obama-Lite Romney, sanctimonious Santorum in his sweater vest , the GOP’s drunken uncle Newt Gingrich, as well as the Republican candidate stuffed-under-the-stairwell ala Harry Potter, Ron Paul. Pops granted Paul his awareness on monetary, fiscal, and foreign policy issues, but ultimately concluded that the rest of the candidates (again, excluding Gary Johnson) are the exact sorts of folks that have gotten us to this point, and are the subject of derision and despair from the real world people in Fixing America. If any of candidates besides Johnson or Paul end up in the White House, Steve Laffey will have an opportunity for a sequel—Rebuilding America.

So I asked my dad what he thought of a presidential contest between Obama and Romney or Santorum:

“It depends on which kettle of fish you want to get boiled in.”

Touché. And that’s why I’ve gone elsewhere for a solution, and in a few minutes I’m going to head to the polls and request a Libertarian Party ballot.

This article is also published at The Country Thinker.

End Note 1

I found this great quote from John Quincy Adams via Facebook:

Always vote for principle, though you may vote alone, and you may cherish the sweetest reflection that your vote is never lost.

End Note 2

Many Republican supporters of Romney argue he is the most electable of the GOP candidates because he appeals to “independent voters.” This ignores the fact that the so-called “independent” vote is not a moderate monolith, and many are simply looking for a principled leader. Offering a waffler like Romney is not going to sway them.

In the end, knowingly or unknowingly, the whole “appeal to independents” theory is the establishment’s way of persuading the GOP to nominate the candidate “most like a Democrat who conservatives might stomach.” It’s not an appeal to independents as much as it is a way to drag the GOP as far to the left as possible. That’s Romney’s purpose as a pawn in this game.

Fortunately, many Tea Partiers I have spoken with get it, and are preparing to jump to the Gary Johnson ship if Romney gets the GOP nod. They understand that 4 more years of Obama with a gridlocked Congress would be better than (potentially) 8 years of Rombama.

(I was humored when I heard a radio commercial from the group ObamaRomney.org. They made the same comment I have many times in the past; Romney is better suited to be Obama’s VP than the GOP’s president.)

About Country Thinker

Ted Lacksonen has written 97 posts in this blog.

I am a proud mem­ber of the Coun­try Class — the roughly 75% of Amer­i­cans who have been effec­tively dis­en­fran­chised by the minor­ity Rul­ing Class. As a law stu­dent and lawyer, I trav­eled (uncom­fort­ably) in Rul­ing Class cir­cles. As an HVAC installer, sheet metal fab­ri­ca­tor, and ship designer, I trav­eled (com­fort­ably) in Coun­try Class cir­cles. My expe­ri­ences in these two widely diver­gent uni­verses have given me a dual per­spec­tive that is uncom­mon among writ­ers and thinkers.

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  • http://capitolcommentary.com Harrison

    I like the Adams quote though I must say a lot of people who voted for Obama were asleep at the switch but the majority of Americans who didn’t vote at all were criminal in their behavior.

  • http://westernhero.blogspot.com Silverfiddle

    I think part of the problem is the brutality of attacks not just on the candidate but the candidate’s family as well. It ran Mitch Daniels and, earlier, Colin Powell off, both good men. Who knows how many other just say to hell with it because of that.

    Dirty campaigns are nothing new, but the technology available permit us to dig into someone’s past like never before.

  • http://www.robbingamerica.com John Galt

    CT, in case your father is interested, he can head instead to our site where we have already published the winners of all 10 states (or predictions from Intrade Prediction Market). We happen to have the same predictions.

    Romney will win 7 states; Santorum 2; Gingrich 1; and Paul 0.

    No need to wait for FOX tonight; unless you want to check us out and see how reliable we are.

  • http://conservativehideout.com Matt

    This has been a thoroughly discouraging primary season. I catch myself wondering who I’m most likely to “settle” for, and then I want to poke myself in the eyeball.

    It’s like the last two decades all over again.

  • http://www.ldjackson.net LD Jackson

    It’s not a pleasant thought, how this GOP race is going to end up. No doubt, Mitt Romney is going to win the nomination, not because he is the better candidate, but because he has more money and the backing of most establishment Republicans. It nearly makes me ill, thinking about the prospects of Romney winning, but I think that is what will happen.

    Will I be able to bring myself to vote for Gary Johnson? I can’t answer that question, at the moment. My biggest fear is that I will help Barack Obama win a second term and casting a third-party vote may help do that. That is not a pleasant thought.